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  1. Carol by Patricia Highsmith

    Carol or The Price of Salt

    By Patricia Highsmith

    Therese is just an ordinary sales assistant working in a New York department store when a beautiful, alluring woman in her thirties walks up to her counter. Standing there, Therese is wholly unprepared for the first shock of love. Therese is an awkward nineteen–year–old with a job she hates and a boyfriends she doesn’t love; Carol us a sophisticated, bored suburban housewife in the throes of a divorce and a custody battle for her only daughter. As Therese becomes irresistibly drawn into Carol’s world, she soon realizes how much they both stand to lose…

  2. Utopia by Thomas More

    Utopia

    By Thomas More

    In Utopia Thomas More painted a fantastical picture of a distant island where society is perfected and people live in harmony, yet its title means ‘no place’, and More’s hugely influential work was ultimately an attack on his own corrupt, dangerous times, and on the failings of humanity. Throughout history, some books have changed the world. They have transformed the way we see ourselves – and each other. They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution. They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted. They have enriched lives – and destroyed them.

  3. White by Kenya Hara

    White

    By Kenya Hara

    “White” is not a book about colors. It is rather Kenya Hara’s attempt to explore the essence of “White”, which he sees as being closely related to the origin of Japanese aesthetics – symbolizing simplicity and subtlety. The central concepts discussed by Kenya Hara in this publication are emptiness and the absolute void. Kenya Hara also sees his work as a designer as a form of communication. Good communication has the distinction of being able to listen to each other, rather than to press one‘s opinion onto the opponent. Kenya Hara compares this form of communication with an “empty container”.

  4. The Invisible Man by H. G. Wells

    The Invisible Man

    By H.G. Wells

    The stranger arrives early in February, one wintry day, through a biting wind and a driving snow. He is wrapped up from head to foot, and the brim of his hat hides every inch of his face. Rude and rough, the stranger works with strange apparatus locked in his room all day and walks along lonely lanes at night, his bandaged face inspiring fear in children and dogs. Is he the mutilated victim of an accident? A criminal on the run? An eccentric genius? But no–one in the village comes close to guessing who has come amongst them, or what those bandages hide.

  5. The Basic Laws of Human Stupidity by Carlo M. Cipolla

    The Basic Laws of Human Stupidity

    By Carlo M. Cipolla

    The stupid are all around us: they are in every place, in every class, ready to cause damage to others and naturally (they are stupid, are they not?) to themselves. The stupid form the most dangerous category of human beings. Woe betide those who underestimate them. The historian Carlo M. Cipolla wrote this essay in a constructive effort to detect, know, and thus possibly neutralize one of the most powerful, dark forces which hinder the growth of human welfare and happiness. And if it then proves impossible to save ourselves from stupidity, at least we can take vengeance by laughing at it.

  6. The Time Machine by H. G. Wells

    The Time Machine

    By H.G. Wells

    When a Victorian scientist propels himself into the year A.D. 802,701, he is initially delighted to find that suffering has been replaced by beauty, contentment, and peace. Entranced at first by the Eloi, an elfin species descended from man, he soon realizes that these beautiful people are simply remnants of a once–great culture—now weak and childishly afraid of the dark. They have every reason to be afraid: in deep tunnels beneath their paradise lurks another race descended from humanity—the sinister Morlocks. And when the scientist’s time machine vanishes, it becomes clear he must search these tunnels if he is ever to return to his own era.

  7. The Fellowship of the Ring by J.R.R. Tolkien

    The Fellowship of the Ring The Lord of the Rings Part 1

    By J.R.R. Tolkien

    In ancient times the Rings of Power were crafted by the Elven–smiths, and Sauron, the Dark Lord, forged the One Ring, filling it with his own power so that he could rule all others. But the One Ring was taken from him, and after many ages it fell into the hands of Bilbo Baggins. In a sleepy village in the Shire, young Frodo Baggins finds himself faced with an immense task, as his elderly cousin Bilbo entrusts the Ring to his care. Frodo must leave his home and make a perilous journey across Middle–earth to the Cracks of Doom, there to destroy the Ring and foil the Dark Lord in his evil purpose.

  8. V for Vendetta by Alan Moore

    V for Vendetta

    By Alan Moore, David Lloyd

    V for Vendetta is a graphic novel written by Alan Moore and illustrated by David Lloyd, published in 1988. The story depicts a dystopian and post–apocalyptic near–future history version of the United Kingdom in the 1990s, where most of the world was destroyed. The comics follow its title character and protagonist, V, an anarchist revolutionary dressed in a Guy Fawkes mask, as he begins an elaborate and theatrical revolutionist campaign to murder his former captors, bring down the government and convince the people to rule themselves, while inspiring a young woman, Evey Hammond, to be his protégé.

  9. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

    The Great Gatsby

    By F. Scott Fitzgerald

    The Great Gatsby is a novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald that was published in 1925. It follows Nick Carraway in the fictional town of West Egg in the summer of 1922. The story is about Nick’s neighbour; the young and mysterious millionaire Jay Gatsby and his passion and obsession for Nick’s beautiful cousin Daisy Buchanan.

  10. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by J.K. Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Parts One and Two

    By Jack Thorne, John Tiffany

    Harry Potter and the Cursed Child begins where the last Harry Potter novel ended, grown up Harry, Hermione and Ron at King’s Cross station seeing their children aboard the Hogwart’s Express. Albus Severus Potter, Harry and Ginny’s middle child, is about to begin his first year at Hogwarts along with his cousin Rose Granger–Weasley. In the train, Albus meets Scorpius Malfoy, where an unlikely friendship begins.

  11. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

    The Alchemist

    By Paulo Coelho

    Paulo Coelho‘s masterpiece tells the mystical story of Santiago, an Andalusian shepherd boy who yearns to travel in search of a worldly treasure. His quest will lead him to riches far different —and far more satisfying— than he ever imagined. Santiago‘s journey teaches us about the essential wisdom of listening to our hearts, of recognizing opportunity and learning to read the omens strewn along life‘s path, and, most importantly, to follow our dreams.

  12. Matilda by Roald Dahl

    Matilda

    By Roald Dahl

    Matilda is a sweet, exceptional young girl, but her parents think she‘s just a nuisance. She expects school to be different but there she has to face Miss Trunchbull, a kid–hating terror of a headmistress. When Matilda is attacked by the Trunchbull she suddenly discovers she has a remarkable power with which to fight back. It‘ll take a superhuman genius to give Miss Trunchbull what she deserves and Matilda may be just the one to do it!

  13. اللص والكلاب لـ نجيب محفوظ

    اللص والكلاب

    لـ نجيب محفوظ

    من البداية يضع نجيب محفوظ القارئ، أمام واقع يعيشه بطل الرواية (سعيد مهران) الخارج لتوه من السجن بعد قضاء أربعة أعوام بسبب ارتكاب سرقة، وقد كانت المرارة التي شعر بها خلال فترة الحبس أقل من أثر المرارة التي تركتها زوجته (نبوية) في نفسه، عندما زين لها صديق سعيد السابق (عليش سدرة) أن تطلب الطلاق من سعيد، ليتزوجها عليش بعد ذلك. كما أن شعوره بأن ابنته الطفلة (سناء) عند هذين الخائنين، زاد من حقده عليهما.

  14. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

    Their Eyes Were Watching God

    By Zora Neale Hurston

    The novel follows the fortunes of Janie Crawford, a woman living in the black town of Eaton, Florida. Hurston sets up her characters and her locale in the first chapter, which, along with the last, acts as a framing device for the story of Janie’s life. One person the citizens of Eaton are inclined to judge is Janie Crawford, who has married three men and been tried for the murder of one of them. Janie feels no compulsion to justify herself to the town, but she does explain herself to her friend, Phoeby, with the implicit understanding that Phoeby can “tell ‘em what Ah say if you wants to. Dat’s just de same as me ‘cause mah tongue is in mah friend’s mouf.”

  15. A Study in Scarlet by Arthur Conan Doyle

    A Study in Scarlet

    By Arthur Conan Doyle

    A Study in Scarlet is a detective mystery novel that follows a “consulting detective” Sherlock Holmes and his friend and chronicler, Dr. John Watson, who later became two of the most famous characters in literature. Conan Doyle wrote the story in 1886, and it was published the following year. The book’s title derives from a speech given by Holmes to Doctor Watson on the nature of his work, in which he describes the story’s murder investigation as his “study in scarlet”.

  16. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

    By J.K. Rowling

    The heart of Book 7 is a hero’s mission — not just in Harry‘s quest for the Horcruxes, but in his journey from boy to man — and Harry faces more danger than that found in all six books combined, from the direct threat of the Death Eaters and you–know–who, to the subtle perils of losing faith in himself. Attentive readers would do well to remember Dumbledore’s warning about making the choice between “what is right and what is easy”.

  17. The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

    The Old Man and the Sea

    By Ernest Hemingway

    Set in the Gulf Stream off the coast of Havana, is the story of an old man, a young boy and a giant fish. Here, in a perfectly crafted story, is a unique and timeless vision of the beauty and grief of man’s challenge to the elements in which he lives. Not a single word is superflous in this widely admired masterpiece, which once and for all established his place as one of the giants of modern literature.

  18. Harry Potter and the Half–Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Half–Blood Prince

    By J.K. Rowling

    The war against Voldemort is not going well; even the Muggles have been affected. Dumbledore is absent from Hogwarts for long stretches of time, and the Order of the Phoenix has already suffered losses. And yet… as with all wars, life goes on. Sixth–year students learn to Apparate. Teenagers flirt and fight and fall in love. Harry receives some extraordinary help in Potions from the mysterious Half–Blood Prince. And with Dumbledore’s guidance, he seeks out the full, complex story of the boy who became Lord Voldemort — and thus finds what may be his only vulnerability.

  19. ساق البامبو لـ سعود السنعوسي

    ساق البامبو

    لـ سعود السنعوسي

    لماذا كان جلوسي تحت الشجرة يزعج أمي؟ أتراها كانت تخشى أن تنبت لي جذور تضرب في عمق الأرض ما يجعل عودتي إلى بلاد أبي أمراً مستحيلاً؟… ربما، ولكن، حتى الجذور لا تعني شيئاً أحياناً. لو كنت مثل نبتة البامبو… لا انتماء لها… نقتطع جزءاً من ساقها… نغرسه، بلا جذور، في أي أرض… لا يلبث الساق طويلاً حتى تنبت له جذور جديدة… تنمو من جديد… في أرض جديدة… بلا ماض… بلا ذاكرة… لا يلتفت إلى اختلاف الناس حول تسميته… كاوايان في الفلبين… خيزران في الكويت… أو بامبو في أماكن أخرى.

  20. Harry Potter and the Order of The Phoenix by J.K. Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

    By J.K. Rowling

    In his fifth year at Hogwart’s, Harry faces challenges at every turn, from the dark threat of He–Who–Must–Not–Be–Named and the unreliability of the government of the magical world to the rise of Ron Weasley as the keeper of the Gryffindor Quidditch Team. Along the way he learns about the strength of his friends, the fierceness of his enemies, and the meaning of sacrifice.