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Short Stories

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  1. Dubliners

    By James Joyce

    Dubliners is a collection of fifteen short stories by James Joyce, first published in 1914. They form a naturalistic depiction of Irish middle class life in and around Dublin in the early years of the 20th century.

  2. The House on Mango Street

    By Sandra Cisneros

    Told in a series of vignettes – sometimes heartbreaking, sometimes deeply joyous–it is the story of a young Latina girl growing up in Chicago, inventing for herself who and what she will become. Few other books in our time have touched so many readers.

  3. The Vampyre; A Tale

    By John William Polidori

    The Vampyre was the first vampire story in English prose, and as such had a wide-ranging influence, almost singlehandedly creating the now-popular image of the vampire as an aristocratic seducer.

  4. The Little Mermaid

    By Hans Christian Andersen

    After saving a prince from drowning, a mermaid princess embraces a life of extreme self-sacrifice to win his love and gain an immortal soul. Over a century after its first publication, Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Little Mermaid” persists as one of the world’s most enduring works of fantasy for children.

  5. أسماء مستعارة

    لـ عبد الرحمن منيف

    كتبت هذه القصص بين عامي 1969-1970 والتي كانت مرحلة تجريبية في حياة الكاتب عبد الرحمن منيف وامتحان أولي لممارسة الكتابة. حتى أن معظمها كتب قبل أي عمل روائي، في وقت كان مغرماً بقراءة القصة القصيرة. كانت هذه القصص تعيش في عقله ووجدانه، وقد تعود بذورها، لحوادث رآها بنفسه ولأشخاص عرفهم وعايشهم وتركت لديه ذلك الخدش الموجع.

  6. The Metamorphosis and other Stories

    By Franz Kafka

    Kafka‘s nightmarish novels and short stories have come to symbolize modern man’s anxiety and alienation in a bizarre, hostile, and dehumanized world. This vision is most fully realized in Kafka’s masterpiece, “The Metamorphosis,” a story that is both harrowing and amusing, and a landmark of modern literature. Bringing together some of Kafka’s finest work, this collection demonstrates the richness and variety of the author’s artistry. “The Judgment,” which Kafka considered to be his decisive breakthrough, and “The Stoker,” which became the first chapter of his novel Amerika, are here included. These two, along with “The Metamorphosis,” form a suite of stories Kafka referred to as “The Sons,” and they collectively present a devastating portrait of the modern family.

  7. The Tales of Beedle the Bard by J.K. Rowling

    The Tales of Beedle the Bard

    By J.K. Rowling

    A wizarding classic, first came to Muggle readers‘ attention in the book known as “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.” Now, thanks to Hermione Granger‘s new translation from the ancient runes, we present this stunning edition with an introduction, notes, and illustrations by J.K. Rowling, and extensive commentary by Albus Dumbledore. Never before have Muggles been privy to these richly imaginative tales: “The Wizard and the Hopping Pot,” “The Fountain of Fair Fortune,” “The Warlock‘s Hairy Heart,” “Babbitty Rabbitty and Her Cackling Stump,” and of course “The Tale of the Three Brothers.” But not only are they the equal of fairy tales we know and love, reading them gives new insight into the wizarding world.

  8. The Queen’s Necklace by Italo Calvino

    The Queen’s Necklace

    By Italo Calvino

    ‘The inspector ordered that the bird be searched. One of the agents stalled saying it made him feel sick, and after some fierce pecking another withdrew sucking a bleeding finger.’ In these two short stories from an inventive, comic master of the form, old friends and friendly rivals Pietro and Tommasso discover a treasure lost by the side of the road, and become suspected of a using a blameless chicken for devious ends. Italo Calvino’s writing explores the fringes of these small, unusual scenes and finds incalculable wisdom and humour there.