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Historical Fiction

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  1. The Kite Runner

    By Khaled Hosseini

    1970s Afghanistan: Twelve-year-old Amir is desperate to win the local kite-fighting tournament and his loyal friend Hassan promises to help him. But neither of the boys can foresee what will happen to Hassan that afternoon, an event that is to shatter their lives…

  2. Jamaica Inn

    By Daphne du Maurier

    The coachman tried to warn her away from the ruined, forbidding place on the rainswept Cornish coast. But young Mary Yellan chose instead to honor her mother’s dying request that she join her frightened Aunt Patience and huge, hulking Uncle Joss Merlyn at Jamaica Inn. From her first glimpse on that raw November eve, she could sense the inn’s dark power. But never did Mary dream that she would become hopelessly ensnared in the vile, villainous schemes being hatched within its crumbling walls — or that a handsome, mysterious stranger would so incite her passions … tempting her to love a man whom she dares not trust.

  3. بين القصرين ثلاثية القاهرة ١

    لـ نجيب محفوظ

    يعنى بتصوير البيئة الاجتماعية في إطارها التاريخي في رواية واقعية تصور حياة الطبقة المتوسطة والشعبية، ويجعل بعض أحياء القاهرة وشوارعها القديمة مجال العمل القصصي ويرسم لهذه الأحياء صوراً مفصلة ويجعلها الإطار المكيف والمؤثر في حياة الأبطال الرافضين الاحتلال والمطالبين بالاستقلال. وهذا الرواية تحمل في ثناياها قصص عن أسرة لكل فرد فيها قصة تجعل منه رواية في حد ذاتهفي بين القصرين يقع منزل السيد أحمد عبد الجواد المكون من حرمه أمينة وابنه الأكبر ياسين وخديجة وفهمى وعائشة وآخر العنقود كمال. يمثل السيد أحمد عبد الجواد السلطة المطلقة في البيت فلا رأى فوق رأيه ولا قول يضاهي قوله، يطيعه أولاده طاعه عمياء حتى أنهم يفضلون الموت ألف مرة عند مواجهة أبيهم.

  4. The Count of Monte Cristo

    By Alexandre Dumas

    In 1815 Edmond Dantès, a young and successful merchant sailor who has just recently been granted the succession of his erstwhile captain Leclère, returns to Marseille to marry his Catalan fiancée Mercédès. Thrown in prison for a crime he has not committed, Edmond Dantès is confined to the grim fortress of If. There he learns of a great hoard of treasure hidden on the Isle of Monte Cristo and he becomes determined not only to escape, but also to unearth the treasure and use it to plot the destruction of the three men responsible for his incarceration.

  5. Purple Hibiscus

    By Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

    Fifteen-year-old Kambili and her older brother Jaja lead a privileged life in Enugu, Nigeria. They live in a beautiful house, with a caring family, and attend an exclusive missionary school. They’re completely shielded from the troubles of the world. Yet, as Kambili reveals in her tender-voiced account, things are less perfect than they appear. Although her Papa is generous and well respected, he is fanatically religious and tyrannical at home—a home that is silent and suffocating.

  6. Julius Caesar

    By William Shakespeare

    The Tragedy of Julius Caesar is a history play and tragedy written by Shakespeare based on true events from Roman history. Although the play is named Julius Caesar, Brutus speaks more than four times as many lines as the title character; and the central psychological drama of the play focuses on Brutus’ struggle between the conflicting demands of honor, patriotism, and friendship.

  7. Oliver Twist

    By Charles Dickens

    Dark, mysterious and mordantly funny, Oliver Twist features some of the most memorably drawn villains in all of fiction – the treacherous gangmaster Fagin, the menacing thug Bill Sikes, the Artful Dodger and their den of thieves in the grimy London backstreets. Dicken’s novel is both an angry indictment of poverty, and an adventure filled with an air of threat and pervasive evil.

  8. العدامة أطياف الأزقة المهجورة ١

    لـ تركي الحمد

    قصة شاب سعودي ينفتح على العالم في مرحلة اساسية من حياة السعودية ١٩٦٧-١٩٧٥ وتجربة شاب محلي تعكس المكان الذي صدرت عنه و تنقل تناقضاته لكنها في الوقت نفسه تجربة كونية تخاطب هموما انسانية عامة. فكيف لطالب صغير ان يكتشف القومية العربية القريبة و البعيدة في آن الواعدة و ذات الشعارات الصارخة معا؟

  9. To Kill a Mockingbird

    By Harper Lee

    A gripping, heart-wrenching, and wholly remarkable tale of coming-of-age in a South poisoned by virulent prejudice, it views a world of great beauty and savage inequities through the eyes of a young girl, as her father ― a crusading local lawyer ― risks everything to defend a black man unjustly accused of a terrible crime.

  10. Les Misérables

    By Victor Hugo

    Beginning in 1815 and culminating in the 1832 June Rebellion in Paris, the novel follows the lives and interactions of several characters, particularly the struggles of ex-convict Jean Valjean and his experience of redemption. After 19 years as a prisoner, Jean Valjean is freed by Javert, the officer in charge of the prison workforce. Valjean promptly breaks parole but later uses money from stolen silver to reinvent himself as a mayor and factory owner. Javert vows to bring Valjean back to prison. Eight years later, Valjean becomes the guardian of a child named Cosette after her mother’s death, but Javert’s relentless pursuit means that peace will be a long time coming.

  11. The Scarlet Letter

    By Nathaniel Hawthorne

    Set in the harsh Puritan community of seventeenth-century Boston, this tale of an adulterous entanglement that results in an illegitimate birth reveals Nathaniel Hawthorne’s concerns with the tension between the public and the private selves. Publicly disgraced and ostracized, Hester Prynne draws on her inner strength and certainty of spirit to emerge as the first true heroine of American fiction.

  12. The Color Purple

    By Alice Walker

    Set in the deep American South between the wars, it is the tale of Celie, a young black girl born into poverty and segregation. Raped repeatedly by the man she calls ‘father’, she has two children taken away from her, is separated from her beloved sister Nettie and is trapped into an ugly marriage. But then she meets the glamorous Shug Avery, singer and magic-maker – a woman who has taken charge of her own destiny. Gradually, Celie discovers the power and joy of her own spirit, freeing her from her past and reuniting her with those she loves.

  13. Homegoing

    By Yaa Gyasi

    Ghana, eighteenth century: two half sisters are born into different villages, each unaware of the other. One will marry an Englishman and lead a life of comfort in the palatial rooms of the Cape Coast Castle. The other will be captured in a raid on her village, imprisoned in the very same castle, and sold into slavery. Homegoing follows the parallel paths of these sisters and their descendants through eight generations: from the Gold Coast to the plantations of Mississippi, from the American Civil War to Jazz Age Harlem. Yaa Gyasi’s extraordinary novel illuminates slavery’s troubled legacy both for those who were taken and those who stayed—and shows how the memory of captivity has been inscribed on the soul of our nation.

  14. Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

    Things Fall Apart

    By Chinua Achebe

    Okonkwo is the greatest wrestler and warrior alive, and his fame spreads throughout West Africa life a bush–fire in the harmattan. But when he accidentally kills a clansman, things begin to fall apart. Then Okonkwo returns from exile to find missionaries and colonial governors have arrived in the village. With the world thrown radically off–balance he can only hurtle towards tragedy.