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  1. Poems Vol. 1 by Emily Dickinson

    Poems Vol. 1

    By Emily Dickinson

    Among the greatest of American poets, Emily Dickinson’s work stands the test of time as some of the most beautiful, elegant, insightful, and influential poetry the world has ever seen. Simply put, American literature would not be where it is today without Dickinson’s exquisite words. Volume 1 contains the collection of poems first published in 1890 (four years after her death).

  2. The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    The Little Prince

    By Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

    Moral allegory and spiritual autobiography, The Little Prince is the most translated book in the French language. With a timeless charm it tells the story of a little boy who leaves the safety of his own tiny planet to travel the universe, learning the vagaries of adult behaviour through a series of extraordinary encounters. His personal odyssey culminates in a voyage to Earth and further adventures.

  3. Othello by William Shakespeare

    Othello

    By William Shakespeare

    Roderigo, a rich and dissolute gentleman, complains to his friend Iago, an ensign, that Iago has not told him about the secret marriage between Desdemona, the daughter of a Senator named Brabantio, and Othello, a Moorish general in the Venetian army.

  4. Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

    Mrs. Dalloway

    By Virginia Woolf

    Mrs. Dalloway is a novel by Virginia Woolf that details a day in the life of Clarissa Dalloway, a fictional high–society woman in post–World War I England. It is one of Woolf’s best–known novels. Created from two short stories, “Mrs Dalloway in Bond Street” and the unfinished “The Prime Minister,” the novel addresses Clarissa’s preparations for a party she will host that evening. With an interior perspective, the story travels forwards and back in time and in and out of the characters’ minds to construct an image of Clarissa’s life and of the inter–war social structure.

  5. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

    The Picture of Dorian Gray

    By Oscar Wilde

    Enthralled by his own exquisite portrait, Dorian Gray exchanges his soul for eternal youth and beauty. Influenced by his friend Lord Henry Wotton, he is drawn into a corrupt double life, indulging his desires in secret while remaining a gentleman in the eyes of polite society. Only his portrait bears the traces of his decadence. The Picture of Dorian Gray was a succès de scandale. Early readers were shocked by its hints at unspeakable sins, and the book was later used as evidence against Wilde at the Old Bailey in 1895.

  6. Nineteen Eighty-Four

    By George Orwell

    The year 1984 has come and gone, but George Orwell’s prophetic, nightmarish vision in 1949 of the world we were becoming is timelier than ever. 1984 is still the great modern classic of “negative utopia” –a startlingly original and haunting novel that creates an imaginary world that is completely convincing, from the first sentence to the last four words. No one can deny the novel’s hold on the imaginations of whole generations, or the power of its admonitions –a power that seems to grow, not lessen, with the passage of time.

  7. The Two Towers by J.R.R. Tolkien

    The Two Towers The Lord of the Rings Part 2

    By J.R.R. Tolkien

    Frodo and his Companions of the Ring have been beset by danger during their quest to prevent the Ruling Ring from falling into the hands of the Dark Lord by destroying it in the Cracks of Doom. They have lost the wizard, Gandalf, in a battle in the Mines of Moria. And Boromir, seduced by the power of the Ring, tried to seize it by force. While Frodo and Sam made their escape, the rest of the company was attacked by Orcs. Now they continue the journey alone down the great River Anduin—alone, that is, save for the mysterious creeping figure that follows wherever they go.

  8. The Invisible Man by H. G. Wells

    The Invisible Man

    By H.G. Wells

    The stranger arrives early in February, one wintry day, through a biting wind and a driving snow. He is wrapped up from head to foot, and the brim of his hat hides every inch of his face. Rude and rough, the stranger works with strange apparatus locked in his room all day and walks along lonely lanes at night, his bandaged face inspiring fear in children and dogs. Is he the mutilated victim of an accident? A criminal on the run? An eccentric genius? But no–one in the village comes close to guessing who has come amongst them, or what those bandages hide.

  9. The Time Machine by H. G. Wells

    The Time Machine

    By H.G. Wells

    When a Victorian scientist propels himself into the year A.D. 802,701, he is initially delighted to find that suffering has been replaced by beauty, contentment, and peace. Entranced at first by the Eloi, an elfin species descended from man, he soon realizes that these beautiful people are simply remnants of a once–great culture—now weak and childishly afraid of the dark. They have every reason to be afraid: in deep tunnels beneath their paradise lurks another race descended from humanity—the sinister Morlocks. And when the scientist’s time machine vanishes, it becomes clear he must search these tunnels if he is ever to return to his own era.

  10. The Fellowship of the Ring The Lord of the Rings Part 1

    By J.R.R. Tolkien

    In ancient times the Rings of Power were crafted by the Elven–smiths, and Sauron, the Dark Lord, forged the One Ring, filling it with his own power so that he could rule all others. But the One Ring was taken from him, and after many ages it fell into the hands of Bilbo Baggins. In a sleepy village in the Shire, young Frodo Baggins finds himself faced with an immense task, as his elderly cousin Bilbo entrusts the Ring to his care. Frodo must leave his home and make a perilous journey across Middle–earth to the Cracks of Doom, there to destroy the Ring and foil the Dark Lord in his evil purpose.

  11. The Great Gatsby

    By F. Scott Fitzgerald

    The Great Gatsby is a novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald that was published in 1925. It follows Nick Carraway in the fictional town of West Egg in the summer of 1922. The story is about Nick’s neighbour; the young and mysterious millionaire Jay Gatsby and his passion and obsession for Nick’s beautiful cousin Daisy Buchanan.

  12. اللص والكلاب لـ نجيب محفوظ

    اللص والكلاب

    لـ نجيب محفوظ

    من البداية يضع نجيب محفوظ القارئ، أمام واقع يعيشه بطل الرواية (سعيد مهران) الخارج لتوه من السجن بعد قضاء أربعة أعوام بسبب ارتكاب سرقة، وقد كانت المرارة التي شعر بها خلال فترة الحبس أقل من أثر المرارة التي تركتها زوجته (نبوية) في نفسه، عندما زين لها صديق سعيد السابق (عليش سدرة) أن تطلب الطلاق من سعيد، ليتزوجها عليش بعد ذلك. كما أن شعوره بأن ابنته الطفلة (سناء) عند هذين الخائنين، زاد من حقده عليهما.

  13. A Study in Scarlet Sherlock Holmes 1

    By Arthur Conan Doyle

    A Study in Scarlet is a detective mystery novel that follows a “consulting detective” Sherlock Holmes and his friend and chronicler, Dr. John Watson, who later became two of the most famous characters in literature. Conan Doyle wrote the story in 1886, and it was published the following year. The book’s title derives from a speech given by Holmes to Doctor Watson on the nature of his work, in which he describes the story’s murder investigation as his “study in scarlet”.

  14. The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

    The Old Man and the Sea

    By Ernest Hemingway

    Set in the Gulf Stream off the coast of Havana, is the story of an old man, a young boy and a giant fish. Here, in a perfectly crafted story, is a unique and timeless vision of the beauty and grief of man’s challenge to the elements in which he lives. Not a single word is superflous in this widely admired masterpiece, which once and for all established his place as one of the giants of modern literature.

  15. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

    The Hobbit or There and Back Again

    By J.R.R. Tolkien

    Bilbo Baggins is a hobbit who enjoys a comfortable, unambitious life, rarely traveling any farther than his pantry or cellar. But his contentment is disturbed when the wizard Gandalf and a company of dwarves arrive on his doorstep one day to whisk him away on an adventure.

  16. The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

    The Count of Monte Cristo

    By Alexandre Dumas

    Set against the turbulent years of the Napoleonic era, Alexandre Dumas’s thrilling adventure story is one of the most widely read romantic novels of all time. In it the dashing young hero, Edmond Dantès, is betrayed by his enemies and thrown into a secret dungeon…