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Classics

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  1. Peter Pan

    By J.M. Barrie

    Peter Pan and Tinkerbell lead the three Darling children over the rooftops of London and away to Neverland – the island where the lost boys play. Magic and mischief is in the air but if villainous Captain Hook has his way, before long someone will be swimming with the crocodiles…

  2. The Return of the King The Lord of the Rings Part 3

    By J.R.R. Tolkien

    As the Shadow of Mordor grows across the land, the Companions of the Ring have become involved in separate adventures. Aragorn, revealed as the hidden heir of the ancient Kings of the West, has joined with the Riders of Rohan against the forces of Isengard, and takes part in the desperate victory of the Hornburg. Merry and Pippin, captured by Orcs, escape into Fangorn Forest and there encounter the Ents. Gandalf has miraculously returned and defeated the evil wizard, Saruman. Sam has left his master for dead after a battle with the giant spider, Shelob; but Frodo is still alive—now in the foul hands of the Orcs. And all the while the armies of the Dark Lord are massing as the One Ring draws ever nearer to the Cracks of Doom.

  3. The Vampyre; A Tale

    By John William Polidori

    The Vampyre was the first vampire story in English prose, and as such had a wide-ranging influence, almost singlehandedly creating the now-popular image of the vampire as an aristocratic seducer.

  4. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

    By Roald Dahl

    Willy Wonka’s famous chocolate factory is opening at last! But only five lucky children will be allowed inside. And the winners are: Augustus Gloop, an enormously fat boy whose hobby is eating; Veruca Salt, a spoiled-rotten brat whose parents are wrapped around her little finger; Violet Beauregarde, a dim-witted gum-chewer with the fastest jaws around; Mike Teavee, a toy pistol-toting gangster-in-training who is obsessed with television; and Charlie Bucket, Our Hero, a boy who is honest and kind, brave and true, and good and ready for the wildest time of his life!

  5. The Talented Mr. Ripley

    By Patricia Highsmith

    In this first Ripley novel, we are introduced to suave Tom Ripley, a young striver, newly arrived in the heady world of Manhattan. A product of a broken home, branded a “sissy” by his dismissive Aunt Dottie, Ripley meets a wealthy industrialist who hires him to bring his playboy son, Dickie Greenleaf, back from gallivanting in Italy. Soon Ripley’s fascination with Dickie’s debonair lifestyle turns obsessive as he finds himself enraged by Dickie’s ambivalent affections for Marge, a charming American dilettante. The Talented Mr. Ripley serves as an unforgettable introduction to this smooth confidence man, whose talent for murder and self-invention is chronicled in four subsequent Ripley novels.

  6. The Little Mermaid

    By Hans Christian Andersen

    After saving a prince from drowning, a mermaid princess embraces a life of extreme self-sacrifice to win his love and gain an immortal soul. Over a century after its first publication, Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Little Mermaid” persists as one of the world’s most enduring works of fantasy for children.

  7. عائد إلى حيفا

    لـ غسان كنفاني

    يرسم غسان كنفاني الوعي الجديد الذي بدأ يتبلور بعد هزيمة ١٩٦٧. إنها محاكمة للذات من خلال إعادة النظر في مفهوم العودة ومفهوم الوطن. فسعيد س. العائد إلى مدينته التي ترك فيها طفله يكتشف أن (الإنسان في نهاية المطاف قضية)، وأن فلسطين ليست استعادة ذكريات، بل هي صناعة للمستقبل.

  8. Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

    By Robert Louis Stevenson

    Published as a shilling shocker, Robert Louis Stevenson’s dark psychological fantasy gave birth to the idea of the split personality. The story of respectable Dr Jekyll’s strange association with damnable young man Edward Hyde; the hunt through fog-bound London for a killer; and the final revelation of Hyde’s true identity is a chilling exploration of humanity’s basest capacity for evil.

  9. The Sign of Four Sherlock Holmes 2

    By Arthur Conan Doyle

    Whilst the seamy streets of London drown in a sea of smog, Sherlock Holmes sinks into a cocaine-induced melancholy, until Miss Mary Morstan presents him with a most intriguing case. A terrible death, an unknown benefactor, stolen treasure, and a secret pact between criminals stretching back to a mutiny-torn India, lead Holmes into an epic pursuit of the truth…

  10. Giovanni’s Room

    By James Baldwin

    Set in the 1950s Paris of American expatriates, liaisons, and violence, a young man finds himself caught between desire and conventional morality. With a sharp, probing imagination, James Baldwin’s now-classic narrative delves into the mystery of loving and creates a moving, highly controversial story of death and passion that reveals the unspoken complexities of the human heart.

  11. خان الخليلي

    لـ نجيب محفوظ

    هذه الرواية حدثت أحداثها في حي اسمه خان الخليلي حيث أخذت الرواية اسمها منه.. تنتقل العائلة الصغيرة من أم وأب وأخوين إلى هذا الحي يطلبون الأمان.. فترى في هذه الرواية الشباب وهو يافعا يانعا في “رشدي” الأخ الأصغر ونراه مستأنسا حين يقع في شباك الحب ونراه يذوى مما قدر له حتى يختفي ويوارى بين الذكريات

  12. القبعة والنبي

    لـ غسان كنفاني

    القبعة والنبي هي محاولة كنفاني المسرحية الثانية بعد -الباب-، وسوف نلاحظ هنا هاجساً مسرحياً تشكيلياً، يقوم على لعبة قفص الاتهام الذي يتحرك ليضم المُتهم مرةً والقضاة في مرة ثانية، وقد يمتد ليشمل جمهور المسرحية المفترض. من يتهم من؟ أم أن الجميع متهمون، وهذا -الشيء- القادم من عالم آخر ليس قبعة أو نبياً، إنه العنصر الذي يعلن استحالة علاقة القاضي – المتهم، فالجميع قتلة وأبرياء في الآن نفسه، لأن الأساس هو السؤال عن الجدوى.

  13. The Metamorphosis and other Stories

    By Franz Kafka

    Kafka‘s nightmarish novels and short stories have come to symbolize modern man’s anxiety and alienation in a bizarre, hostile, and dehumanized world. This vision is most fully realized in Kafka’s masterpiece, “The Metamorphosis,” a story that is both harrowing and amusing, and a landmark of modern literature. Bringing together some of Kafka’s finest work, this collection demonstrates the richness and variety of the author’s artistry. “The Judgment,” which Kafka considered to be his decisive breakthrough, and “The Stoker,” which became the first chapter of his novel Amerika, are here included. These two, along with “The Metamorphosis,” form a suite of stories Kafka referred to as “The Sons,” and they collectively present a devastating portrait of the modern family.

  14. Lord of the Flies

    By William Golding

    When a plane crashes on a remote island, a small group of schoolboys are the sole survivors. From the prophetic Simon and virtuous Ralph to the lovable Piggy and brutish Jack, each of the boys attempts to establish control as the reality – and brutal savagery – of their situation sets in. The boys’ struggle to find a way of existing in a community with no fixed boundaries invites readers to evaluate the concepts involved in social and political constructs and moral frameworks. Ideas of community, leadership, and the rule of law are called into question as the reader has to consider who has a right to power, why, and what the consequences of the acquisition of power may be.

  15. Romeo and Juliet

    By William Shakespeare

    Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy about two young star-crossed lovers whose families are feuding with one another. It was among Shakespeare’s most popular plays during his lifetime and along with Hamlet, is one of his most frequently performed plays. Today, the title characters are regarded as archetypal young lovers.

  16. Fahrenheit 451

    By Ray Bradbury

    Guy Montag is a fireman. In his world, where television rules and literature is on the brink of extinction, firemen start fires rather than put them out. His job is to destroy the most illegal of commodities, the printed book, along with the houses in which they are hidden.

  17. A Wrinkle in Time

    By Madeleine L’Engle

    Meg Murry and her friends become involved with unearthly strangers and a search for Meg’s father, who has disappeared while engaged in secret work for the government.

  18. Jane Eyre

    By Charlotte Brontë

    As an orphan, Jane’s childhood is full of trouble, but her stubborn independence and sense of self help her to steer through the miseries inflicted by cruel relatives and a brutal school. A position as governess at the Thornfield Hall promises a kind of freedom. But Thornfield is a house full of secrets, its master a passionate, tormented man, and before long Jane faces her greatest struggle in a choice between love and self-respect.

  19. Frankenstein or The Modern Prometheus

    By Mary Shelley

    At once a Gothic thriller, a passionate romance, and a cautionary tale about the dangers of science, Frankenstein tells the story of committed science student Victor Frankenstein. Obsessed with discovering the cause of generation and life and bestowing animation upon lifeless matter, Frankenstein assembles a human being from stolen body parts but; upon bringing it to life, he recoils in horror at the creature’s hideousness. Tormented by isolation and loneliness, the once-innocent creature turns to evil and unleashes a campaign of murderous revenge against his creator, Frankenstein.

  20. Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie

    Murder on the Orient Express Hercule Poirot #10

    By Agatha Christie

    Just after midnight, a snowdrift stops the Orient Express in its tracks. The luxurious train is surprisingly full for the time of the year, but by the morning it is one passenger fewer. An American tycoon lies dead in his compartment, stabbed a dozen times, his door locked from the inside. Isolated and with a killer in their midst, detective Hercule Poirot must identify the murderer – in case he or she decides to strike again.