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Adventure

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  1. The House at Pooh Corner

    By A.A. Milne

    ‘One day when Pooh Bear had nothing else to do, he thought he would do something, so he went round to Piglet’s house to see what Piglet was doing.’ This is the second classic children’s story by A.A. Milne about Winnie-the-Pooh and his friends in the Hundred Acre Wood. In this volume Pooh meets the irrepressible Tigger for the first time, learns to play Poohsticks and sets a trap for a Heffalump.

  2. Winnie-the-Pooh

    By A.A. Milne

    Winnie-the-Pooh may be a bear of very little brain, but thanks to his friends Piglet, Eeyore and, of course, Christopher Robin, he’s never far from an adventure. In this story Pooh gets into a tight place, nearly catches a Woozle and heads off on an ‘expotition’ to the North Pole with the other animals.

  3. Peter Pan

    By J.M. Barrie

    Peter Pan and Tinkerbell lead the three Darling children over the rooftops of London and away to Neverland – the island where the lost boys play. Magic and mischief is in the air but if villainous Captain Hook has his way, before long someone will be swimming with the crocodiles…

  4. The Return of the King The Lord of the Rings Part 3

    By J.R.R. Tolkien

    As the Shadow of Mordor grows across the land, the Companions of the Ring have become involved in separate adventures. Aragorn, revealed as the hidden heir of the ancient Kings of the West, has joined with the Riders of Rohan against the forces of Isengard, and takes part in the desperate victory of the Hornburg. Merry and Pippin, captured by Orcs, escape into Fangorn Forest and there encounter the Ents. Gandalf has miraculously returned and defeated the evil wizard, Saruman. Sam has left his master for dead after a battle with the giant spider, Shelob; but Frodo is still alive—now in the foul hands of the Orcs. And all the while the armies of the Dark Lord are massing as the One Ring draws ever nearer to the Cracks of Doom.

  5. A Wrinkle in Time

    By Madeleine L’Engle

    Meg Murry and her friends become involved with unearthly strangers and a search for Meg’s father, who has disappeared while engaged in secret work for the government.

  6. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll

    Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass

    By Lewis Carroll

    As Alice explores a bizarre underground world, she encounters a cast of strange characters and fanciful beasts: the White Rabbit, March Hare, and Mad Hatter; the sleepy Dormouse and grinning Cheshire Cat; the Mock Turtle, the dreadful Queen of Hearts, and a host of other extraordinary personalities.

  7. The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    The Little Prince

    By Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

    Moral allegory and spiritual autobiography, The Little Prince is the most translated book in the French language. With a timeless charm it tells the story of a little boy who leaves the safety of his own tiny planet to travel the universe, learning the vagaries of adult behaviour through a series of extraordinary encounters. His personal odyssey culminates in a voyage to Earth and further adventures.

  8. The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis

    The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe The Chronicles of Narnia

    By C.S. Lewis

    Four adventurous siblings—Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy Pevensie—step through a wardrobe door and into the land of Narnia, a land frozen in eternal winter and enslaved by the power of the White Witch. But when almost all hope is lost, the return of the Great Lion, Aslan, signals a great change… and a great sacrifice.

  9. The Tales of Beedle the Bard by J.K. Rowling

    The Tales of Beedle the Bard

    By J.K. Rowling

    A wizarding classic, first came to Muggle readers‘ attention in the book known as “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.” Now, thanks to Hermione Granger‘s new translation from the ancient runes, we present this stunning edition with an introduction, notes, and illustrations by J.K. Rowling, and extensive commentary by Albus Dumbledore. Never before have Muggles been privy to these richly imaginative tales: “The Wizard and the Hopping Pot,” “The Fountain of Fair Fortune,” “The Warlock‘s Hairy Heart,” “Babbitty Rabbitty and Her Cackling Stump,” and of course “The Tale of the Three Brothers.” But not only are they the equal of fairy tales we know and love, reading them gives new insight into the wizarding world.

  10. The Two Towers by J.R.R. Tolkien

    The Two Towers The Lord of the Rings Part 2

    By J.R.R. Tolkien

    Frodo and his Companions of the Ring have been beset by danger during their quest to prevent the Ruling Ring from falling into the hands of the Dark Lord by destroying it in the Cracks of Doom. They have lost the wizard, Gandalf, in a battle in the Mines of Moria. And Boromir, seduced by the power of the Ring, tried to seize it by force. While Frodo and Sam made their escape, the rest of the company was attacked by Orcs. Now they continue the journey alone down the great River Anduin—alone, that is, save for the mysterious creeping figure that follows wherever they go.

  11. The Time Machine by H. G. Wells

    The Time Machine

    By H.G. Wells

    When a Victorian scientist propels himself into the year A.D. 802,701, he is initially delighted to find that suffering has been replaced by beauty, contentment, and peace. Entranced at first by the Eloi, an elfin species descended from man, he soon realizes that these beautiful people are simply remnants of a once–great culture—now weak and childishly afraid of the dark. They have every reason to be afraid: in deep tunnels beneath their paradise lurks another race descended from humanity—the sinister Morlocks. And when the scientist’s time machine vanishes, it becomes clear he must search these tunnels if he is ever to return to his own era.

  12. The Fellowship of the Ring by J.R.R. Tolkien

    The Fellowship of the Ring The Lord of the Rings Part 1

    By J.R.R. Tolkien

    In ancient times the Rings of Power were crafted by the Elven–smiths, and Sauron, the Dark Lord, forged the One Ring, filling it with his own power so that he could rule all others. But the One Ring was taken from him, and after many ages it fell into the hands of Bilbo Baggins. In a sleepy village in the Shire, young Frodo Baggins finds himself faced with an immense task, as his elderly cousin Bilbo entrusts the Ring to his care. Frodo must leave his home and make a perilous journey across Middle–earth to the Cracks of Doom, there to destroy the Ring and foil the Dark Lord in his evil purpose.

  13. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by J.K. Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Parts One and Two

    By Jack Thorne, John Tiffany

    Harry Potter and the Cursed Child begins where the last Harry Potter novel ended, grown up Harry, Hermione and Ron at King’s Cross station seeing their children aboard the Hogwart’s Express. Albus Severus Potter, Harry and Ginny’s middle child, is about to begin his first year at Hogwarts along with his cousin Rose Granger–Weasley. In the train, Albus meets Scorpius Malfoy, where an unlikely friendship begins.

  14. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

    The Alchemist

    By Paulo Coelho

    Paulo Coelho‘s masterpiece tells the mystical story of Santiago, an Andalusian shepherd boy who yearns to travel in search of a worldly treasure. His quest will lead him to riches far different —and far more satisfying— than he ever imagined. Santiago‘s journey teaches us about the essential wisdom of listening to our hearts, of recognizing opportunity and learning to read the omens strewn along life‘s path, and, most importantly, to follow our dreams.

  15. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

    Their Eyes Were Watching God

    By Zora Neale Hurston

    The novel follows the fortunes of Janie Crawford, a woman living in the black town of Eaton, Florida. Hurston sets up her characters and her locale in the first chapter, which, along with the last, acts as a framing device for the story of Janie’s life. One person the citizens of Eaton are inclined to judge is Janie Crawford, who has married three men and been tried for the murder of one of them. Janie feels no compulsion to justify herself to the town, but she does explain herself to her friend, Phoeby, with the implicit understanding that Phoeby can “tell ‘em what Ah say if you wants to. Dat’s just de same as me ‘cause mah tongue is in mah friend’s mouf.”

  16. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

    By J.K. Rowling

    The heart of Book 7 is a hero’s mission — not just in Harry‘s quest for the Horcruxes, but in his journey from boy to man — and Harry faces more danger than that found in all six books combined, from the direct threat of the Death Eaters and you–know–who, to the subtle perils of losing faith in himself. Attentive readers would do well to remember Dumbledore’s warning about making the choice between “what is right and what is easy”.

  17. The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

    The Old Man and the Sea

    By Ernest Hemingway

    Set in the Gulf Stream off the coast of Havana, is the story of an old man, a young boy and a giant fish. Here, in a perfectly crafted story, is a unique and timeless vision of the beauty and grief of man’s challenge to the elements in which he lives. Not a single word is superflous in this widely admired masterpiece, which once and for all established his place as one of the giants of modern literature.

  18. Harry Potter and the Half–Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Half–Blood Prince

    By J.K. Rowling

    The war against Voldemort is not going well; even the Muggles have been affected. Dumbledore is absent from Hogwarts for long stretches of time, and the Order of the Phoenix has already suffered losses. And yet… as with all wars, life goes on. Sixth–year students learn to Apparate. Teenagers flirt and fight and fall in love. Harry receives some extraordinary help in Potions from the mysterious Half–Blood Prince. And with Dumbledore’s guidance, he seeks out the full, complex story of the boy who became Lord Voldemort — and thus finds what may be his only vulnerability.

  19. Harry Potter and the Order of The Phoenix by J.K. Rowling

    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

    By J.K. Rowling

    In his fifth year at Hogwart’s, Harry faces challenges at every turn, from the dark threat of He–Who–Must–Not–Be–Named and the unreliability of the government of the magical world to the rise of Ron Weasley as the keeper of the Gryffindor Quidditch Team. Along the way he learns about the strength of his friends, the fierceness of his enemies, and the meaning of sacrifice.

  20. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

    The Hobbit or There and Back Again

    By J.R.R. Tolkien

    Bilbo Baggins is a hobbit who enjoys a comfortable, unambitious life, rarely traveling any farther than his pantry or cellar. But his contentment is disturbed when the wizard Gandalf and a company of dwarves arrive on his doorstep one day to whisk him away on an adventure.