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  1. Hamlet

    By William Shakespeare

    The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, often shortened to Hamlet, is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare. Set in Denmark, the play depicts Prince Hamlet and his revenge against his uncle, Claudius, who has murdered Hamlet’s father in order to seize his throne and marry Hamlet’s mother.

  2. The Hound of the Baskervilles Sherlock Holmes 5

    By Arthur Conan Doyle

    The coroner may have ruled death by natural causes. but Sherlock Holmes knows there’s something more sinister behind Sir Charles Baskerville’s demise. The question is, could he really have fallen victim to the legendary phantom hound, the curse said to have haunted his ancestors for generations? Or is this the work of a very real and calculating murderer?

  3. قصر الشوق

    لـ نجيب محفوظ

    بعد (بين القصرين)، تمر خمس سنوات، ويخرج الأب إلى الحياة، لقد انتقلت بناته بعد زواجهن إلى حى قصر الشوق بالجمالية خلال العشرينات من هذا القرن، حيث ولدت زنوبة فى بيت العالمه زبيده ولم يلتفت إليها السيد عبدالجواد وقد ترك حياة الليل. ومن هنا تبدأ أحداث الجزء الثاني من ثلاثية القاهرة الشهيرة.

  4. The Complete Maus

    By Art Spiegelman

    Combined for the first time here are Maus I: A Survivor’s Tale and Maus II – the complete story of Vladek Spiegelman and his wife, living and surviving in Hitler’s Europe. By addressing the horror of the Holocaust through cartoons, the author captures the everyday reality of fear and is able to explore the guilt, relief and extraordinary sensation of survival – and how the children of survivors are in their own way affected by the trials of their parents.

  5. Notes of a Native Son

    By James Baldwin

    James Baldwin’s breakthrough essay collection made him the voice of his generation. Ranging over Harlem in the 1940s, movies, novels, his preacher father and his experiences of Paris, they capture the complexity of black life at the dawn of the civil rights movement with effervescent wit and prophetic wisdom.

  6. Atonement

    By Ian McEwan

    On a hot summer day in 1935, thirteen-year-old Briony Tallis witnesses the flirtation between her older sister, Cecilia, and Robbie Turner, the son of a servant. But Briony’s incomplete grasp of adult motives and her precocious imagination bring about a crime that will change all their lives, a crime whose repercussions Atonement follows through the chaos and carnage of World War II and into the close of the twentieth century.

  7. The Double and The Gambler

    By Fyodor Dostoevsky

    The Double is a surprisingly modern hallucinatory nightmare–foreshadowing Kafka and Sartre–in which a minor official named Goliadkin becomes aware of a mysterious doppelganger, a man who has his name and his face and who gradually and relentlessly begins to displace him with his friends and colleagues. The Gambler is a stunning psychological portrait of a young man’s exhilarating and destructive addiction to gambling, a compulsion that Dostoevsky–who once gambled away his young wife’s wedding ring–knew intimately from his own experience. In chronicling the disastrous love affairs and gambling adventures of Alexei Ivanovich, Dostoevsky explores the irresistible temptation to look into the abyss of ultimate risk that he believed was an essential part of the Russian national character.

  8. The Catcher in the Rye

    By J.D. Salinger

    A classic novel originally published for adults, has since become popular among adolescent readers for its themes of angst, alienation and as a critique on superficiality in society. The story is narrated by Holden Caulfield, a 17 year-old teenager recalling events of the previous Christmas after he was kicked out from school.

  9. Death on the Nile Hercule Poirot #17

    By Agatha Christie

    The tranquillity of a cruise along the Nile was shattered by the discovery that Linnet Ridgeway had been shot through the head. She was young, stylish, and beautiful. A girl who had everything…until she lost her life. Hercule Poirot recalled an earlier outburst by a fellow passenger: “I’d like to put my dear little pistol against her head and just press the trigger.” Yet in this exotic setting nothing is ever quite what it seems.

  10. A Room of One’s Own and Three Guineas

    By Virginia Woolf

    This volume combines two books which were among the greatest contributions to feminist literature this century. Together they form a brilliant attack on sexual inequality. A Room of One’s Own, first published in 1929, is a witty, urbane and persuasive argument against the intellectual subjection of women, particularly women writers. The sequel, Three Guineas, is a passionate polemic which draws a startling comparison between the tyrannous hypocrisy of the Victorian patriarchal system and the evils of fascism.

  11. The War of the Worlds

    By H.G. Wells

    The night after a shooting star is seen streaking through the sky from Mars, a cylinder is discovered on Horsell Common near London. At first, naive locals approach the cylinder armed just with a white flag – only to be quickly killed by an all-destroying heat-ray as terrifying tentacled invaders emerge. Soon the whole of human civilization is under threat, as powerful Martians build gigantic killing machines, destroy all in their path with black gas and burning rays, and feast on the warm blood of trapped, still-living human prey. The forces of the Earth, however, may prove harder to beat than they at first appear.

  12. When We Were Very Young

    By A.A. Milne

    When We Were Very Young is a best-selling book of poetry by A. A. Milne. It was first published in 1924, and was illustrated by E. H. Shepard. Several of the verses were set to music by Harold Fraser-Simson. The book begins with an introduction entitled “Just Before We Begin”, which, in part, tells readers to imagine for themselves who the narrator is, and that it might be Christopher Robin.

  13. طوق الطهارة

    لـ محمد حسن علوان

    كانت كتابة الرواية تشبه زراعة حقل من الأفيون يخدرني إلى أجل مسمى. فَصَدَ مني الكثير من الكلام كي تعود الروح إلى دورتها المطمئنة بضع سنين حتى يتراكم كلامٌ آخر.. تفيض به المسارب والطرقات ومحاولات التفادي والإنكاروتنمو على القلب مرة أخرى أعشابه العشوائية المعتادة وينتابني الصحو المؤلم عندما ينتهي مفعول الرواية السابقة!

  14. Black Panther: Book 3 A Nation Under Our Feet

    By Ta-Nehisi Coates

    The full truth of the People’s revolution – and the power players supporting it – has been revealed! Now, T’Challa must fight like never before for the fate of his nation – and one of his most trusted allies is back to stand by his side. As the final battle begins, the entirety of Wakanda’s glorious history may be their most potent weapon. But even if the People fall, can the monarchy still stand? The pieces are all in position, now it’s time for Ta-Nehisi Coates and Brian Stelfreeze to knock over the board as their revitalization of Black Panther continues!

  15. The Kite Runner

    By Khaled Hosseini

    1970s Afghanistan: Twelve-year-old Amir is desperate to win the local kite-fighting tournament and his loyal friend Hassan promises to help him. But neither of the boys can foresee what will happen to Hassan that afternoon, an event that is to shatter their lives…

  16. Sense and Sensibility

    By Jane Austen

    Elinor is as prudent as her sister Marianne is impetuous. Each must learn from the other after they are they are forced by their father’s death to leave their home and enter into the contests of polite society. The charms of unsuitable men and the schemes of rival ladies mean that their paths to success are thwart with disappointment but together they attempt to find a way to happiness.

  17. The Taming of the Shrew

    By William Shakespeare

    The Taming of the Shrew depicts the courtship of Petruchio and Katherina, the headstrong, obdurate shrew. Initially, Katherina is an unwilling participant in the relationship; however, Petruchio “tames” her with various psychological torments, such as keeping her from eating and drinking, until she becomes a desirable, compliant, and obedient bride.

  18. Jamaica Inn

    By Daphne du Maurier

    The coachman tried to warn her away from the ruined, forbidding place on the rainswept Cornish coast. But young Mary Yellan chose instead to honor her mother’s dying request that she join her frightened Aunt Patience and huge, hulking Uncle Joss Merlyn at Jamaica Inn. From her first glimpse on that raw November eve, she could sense the inn’s dark power. But never did Mary dream that she would become hopelessly ensnared in the vile, villainous schemes being hatched within its crumbling walls — or that a handsome, mysterious stranger would so incite her passions … tempting her to love a man whom she dares not trust.

  19. The Wizard of Oz Oz 1

    By L. Frank Baum

    Dorothy thinks she is lost forever when a terrifying tornado crashes through Kansas and whisks her and her dog, Toto, far away to the magical land of Oz. To get home Dorothy must follow the yellow brick road to Emerald City and find the wonderfully mysterious Wizard of Oz. Together with her companions the Tin Woodman, the Scarecrow and the Cowardly Lion whom she meets on the way, Dorothy embarks on a strange and enchanting adventure.

  20. The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes Sherlock Holmes 4

    By Arthur Conan Doyle

    A man like Sherlock Holmes has many enemies. Violent murderers, deviant villains, ghosts of old loves, blackmailers and poisonous scribes, to to name but a few. But none are so deadly, so powerful, as Professor Moriarty. Moriarty – the only man who can compete with Holmes’ genius. The only man who can, perhaps, ultimately defeat the great detective…